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Everything you need to enjoy National Curry Week

Hello, everyone.

I love all things British – especially the eccentricities! – and is there anything more British than cosying up with a curry on a cold Saturday night? Reinventing delicious recipes from India with an Anglo twist, curry houses across the United Kingdom are packed each weekend, not to mention the bags of takeaways flying out of their doors to be savoured on sofas at home in front of the next big Netflix binge!

As a proud British-Jamaican, I count myself as a curry fan – a combination of a love for the exotic flavours from my homeland alongside being accustomed to new-found traditions here – so it’s with great anticipation that I look forward to National Curry Week every year. Celebrated in October, this year’s marks the 24th event from 3-9 October, and was created in 1998 by late journalist Peter Grove to drive awareness and foster appreciation for the burgeoning Indian restaurant industry while raising crucial funds for charity.

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The objectives today remain the same: honour the nation’s favourite cuisine; support the Indian restaurant industry; and raise money for poverty-focused charities. There are several ways for you to get involved, from visiting your local curry house to hosting a curry night at home, both of which contribute to flying the flag for this much-loved food.

I, for one, will be showing off my skills in the kitchen by cooking up a few curries a little closer to home straight from my mother’s recipe book. I’m thinking Curried Mutton – a traditional Jamaican curry that offers a real flavour of the Caribbean – served alongside Coconut Rice & Peas (a dish that needs no introduction!) and washed down with a couple of bottles of The Black Farmer Brigg Stow 115, a spicy and fruity ale made in Bristol that’s easy and delicious to drink. The perfect partner for a fiery curry!

The objectives today remain the same: honour the nation’s favourite cuisine; support the Indian restaurant industry; and raise money for poverty-focused charities. There are several ways for you to get involved, from visiting your local curry house to hosting a curry night at home, both of which contribute to flying the flag for this much-loved food.

I, for one, will be showing off my skills in the kitchen by cooking up a few curries a little closer to home straight from my mother’s recipe book. I’m thinking Curried Mutton – a traditional Jamaican curry that offers a real flavour of the Caribbean – served alongside Coconut Rice & Peas (a dish that needs no introduction!) and washed down with a couple of bottles of The Black Farmer Brigg Stow 115, a spicy and fruity ale made in Bristol that’s easy and delicious to drink. The perfect partner for a fiery curry!

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Below, I’ve pulled together a shopping list of the products you need to recreate the meal my own family will be enjoying, so let me know how you get on! Remember, you can always round-up friends and ask each guest to bring a different dish to the party. I call it a ‘potluck’ spread!

Shopping List