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Are You The Next Face Of Farming?

Hello, everyone.

As you know, I was born in rural Jamaica, and came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation. Despite growing up in urban Birmingham, I used to dream of living and working in rural Britain, inspired – in large part – by helping out on the family allotment.

I finally realised my life-long dream when I found my farm on the borders of Cornwall and Devon. But I soon discovered that diversity in the agricultural community was non-existent. Everyone came from a farming background – and certainly, nobody looked like me! – and to this day I’m still the only black farmer in the country.

Hello, everyone.

As you know, I was born in rural Jamaica, and came to the UK as part of the Windrush generation. Despite growing up in urban Birmingham, I used to dream of living and working in rural Britain, inspired – in large part – by helping out on the family allotment.

I finally realised my life-long dream when I found my farm on the borders of Cornwall and Devon. But I soon discovered that diversity in the agricultural community was non-existent. Everyone came from a farming background – and certainly, nobody looked like me! – and to this day I’m still the only black farmer in the country.

Which is why I’ve teamed up with Writtle University College in Chelmsford on the exciting New Faces of Farming initiative. The aim is to open the door to an agricultural career for those who aren’t from a traditional farming background and fix the diversity drought in the industry.

Our residential weekend camp will give teenagers in years 12 or 13 a taste of farm life and provide an opportunity to think about a career in the sector. To celebrate, we’re offering 20 spaces to the camp in October, all fully-expensed. With my roots in Jamaica, I’ve always had a passion to live and work in rural Britain, so I’m looking for those who share my passion.

Which is why I’ve teamed up with Writtle University College in Chelmsford on the exciting New Faces of Farming initiative. The aim is to open the door to an agricultural career for those who aren’t from a traditional farming background and fix the diversity drought in the industry.

Our residential weekend camp will give teenagers in years 12 or 13 a taste of farm life and provide an opportunity to think about a career in the sector. To celebrate, we’re offering 20 spaces to the camp in October, all fully-expensed. With my roots in Jamaica, I’ve always had a passion to live and work in rural Britain, so I’m looking for those who share my passion.

and help change the face of farming.

and help change the face of farming.